Conference Programme

Our confirmed guest speakers for 2016 are Professor Claire Davis of the University of Warwick and Dr Matthew Lunt of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Additional speakers will be announced shortly.

Prof Claire Davis University of Warwick

Advanced steels processing and characterisation

Steel is the second most used material in the world by weight, after concrete. Its combination of high strength, ductility and toughness make it an ideal material for structural applications, being used in a wide range of industries from construction to automotive.whole conference or only one of the days.

Steel also has other attractive properties making it the material of choice in many applications; for example from its electromagnetic properties (Si steels) in motors to its corrosion resistance properties (stainless steels) in biomedical implants. Increasing customer demands and requirements for low energy production, amongst other reasons, drives steel developments: for example new steel grades, such as low-density high aluminium steels and advanced high strength strip steels are being developed for automotive applications; and to enable low energy production technologies such as belt or twin roll casting are being developed and non-destructive sensors, to provide dynamic feedback for process control, are increasingly being used in steel mills.

high strength strip steels are being developed for automotive applications

conf-speaker-img.jpg

Facilities being set up in the new Advanced Steel Research Centre within the Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG), at the University of Warwick, allow in-situ analysis and characterisation during steel processing and the development of new steel grades. In this talk some of the research on casting and rolling of steel alloys and the development of electromagnetic (EM) sensors for non-destructive characterisation of microstructure and process control feedback will be discussed. Direct observation of steel solidification using confocal laser scanning microscopy has revealed the dendritic growth rates, with post solidification characterisation of composition spatial distributions being used to validate models of segregation behaviour. The combined modeling and experimental validation approach is also essential for the non-destructive sensor development and examples will be given on the how EM sensors can be used to measure second phase amount and distribution in dual phase steels, with these signals being used to predict the strength of the steel strip.

Prof Claire Davis was appointed as the Tata Steel Professor of Thermo-Mechanical Processing in WMG at the University of Warwick in September 2014. She was previously the Professor of Ferrous Metallurgy at the University of Birmingham. Her research interests are on the development of microstructure during processing and the relationships between microstructure and properties (both physical and mechanical) in steels. She also works on the non-destructive evaluation of microstructure and defects in steel.

Bio

Prof Claire Davis was appointed as the Tata Steel Professor of Thermo-Mechanical Processing in WMG at the University of Warwick in September 2014. She was previously the Professor of Ferrous Metallurgy at the University of Birmingham. Her research interests are on the development of microstructure during processing and the relationships between microstructure and properties (both physical and mechanical) in steels. She also works on the non-destructive evaluation of microstructure and defects in steel.

Dr Matt Lunt DSTL

Advanced steels processing and characterisation

Steel is the second most used material in the world by weight, after concrete. Its combination of high strength, ductility and toughness make it an ideal material for structural applications, being used in a wide range of industries from construction to automotive.whole conference or only one of the days.

Steel also has other attractive properties making it the material of choice in many applications; for example from its electromagnetic properties (Si steels) in motors to its corrosion resistance properties (stainless steels) in biomedical implants. Increasing customer demands and requirements for low energy production, amongst other reasons, drives steel developments: for example new steel grades, such as low-density high aluminium steels and advanced high strength strip steels are being developed for automotive applications; and to enable low energy production technologies such as belt or twin roll casting are being developed and non-destructive sensors, to provide dynamic feedback for process control, are increasingly being used in steel mills.

conf-speaker-img.jpg

high strength strip steels are being developed for automotive applications

Facilities being set up in the new Advanced Steel Research Centre within the Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG), at the University of Warwick, allow in-situ analysis and characterisation during steel processing and the development of new steel grades. In this talk some of the research on casting and rolling of steel alloys and the development of electromagnetic (EM) sensors for non-destructive characterisation of microstructure and process control feedback will be discussed. Direct observation of steel solidification using confocal laser scanning microscopy has revealed the dendritic growth rates, with post solidification characterisation of composition spatial distributions being used to validate models of segregation behaviour. The combined modeling and experimental validation approach is also essential for the non-destructive sensor development and examples will be given on the how EM sensors can be used to measure second phase amount and distribution in dual phase steels, with these signals being used to predict the strength of the steel strip.
Prof Claire Davis was appointed as the Tata Steel Professor of Thermo-Mechanical Processing in WMG at the University of Warwick in September 2014. She was previously the Professor of Ferrous Metallurgy at the University of Birmingham. Her research interests are on the development of microstructure during processing and the relationships between microstructure and properties (both physical and mechanical) in steels. She also works on the non-destructive evaluation of microstructure and defects in steel.

Bio

Prof Claire Davis was appointed as the Tata Steel Professor of Thermo-Mechanical Processing in WMG at the University of Warwick in September 2014. She was previously the Professor of Ferrous Metallurgy at the University of Birmingham. Her research interests are on the development of microstructure during processing and the relationships between microstructure and properties (both physical and mechanical) in steels. She also works on the non-destructive evaluation of microstructure and defects in steel.